Imaging tutorial at Westminster Reference Library (14th March 2020)

On 28th March we are holding a whole day astronomy imaging tutorial at Westminster Reference Library (link to tickets to be released soon). We are collecting information from the public, what exactly should be our main focus – Moon, International Space Station, planets and at what depth on the image taking and image processing we should get into.

Anyone who would like to attend could contact me on this email address (metrolinaszabi@gmail.com) and let me know about his/her opinion.

I irregularly hold talks about the International Space Station in the library. If you would like to join the talk next time, maybe ask me about imaging of the ISS in person, please subscribe to Westminster Reference Library’s mailing list at the library’s event page and get notified by the next talk. Alternatively follow their Eventbrite page where seats to all the future talks can be booked.

Timeline:

11am

Start of class

11:00 to 11:15

Introductions

11:15 to 12:15

Equipment overview (beginner to advanced)

Equipment setup

Q & A

12:15 to 13:15

Lunch Break

13:15 to 14:15

Lunar and Planetary imaging using firecapture

Q & A

14:15 to 14:30

Short break

14:30 to 15:30

ISS imaging

Q & A

15:30 to 16:00

Processing

Programs used

Location:
Westminster Reference Library
35 St. Martin’s StreetLondonWC2H 7HP

Date and Time
Saturday, 28th March 2020
(time will be announced soon)

Book your tickets on this link:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/astro-imaging-tutorial-tickets-97588318287

 

My next talk about the International Space Station (6th April 2020)

During this one hour talk I will introduce you to the greatest technological achievement of the entire human race – the International Space Station (ISS). We did not only go to space, but we learned how to live and survive up there too.

The Space Station does a full orbit around Earth every 92 minutes, travels at a speed of 27.800 kph (17.100 mph), orbits our planet 15.5 times a day and most of the world’s population can observe it. On a clear evening there is nothing more mesmerising experience than to lay back and watch the ISS flying over London, a quiet but extremely bright “star” – knowing that there are dedicated people up there doing cutting edge scientific researches for the benefit of all humankind.

Location:
West of London Astronomical Society (WOLAS)
Christ Church, Redford Way, Uxbridge

Date and Time
Monday, 6th April 2020
at 20:00